Morocco

Recipes from Morocco

Tangine (national dish)/Meat and Vegetable Stew

Ingredients:

2 teaspoons vegetable oil
2 cups chopped onion
2 large cloves garlic, crushed
1 cup carrots, sliced crosswise 1/8 inch thick
1 large green bell pepper, cut into 1/4 inch strips
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon each: ground allspice, ground ginger, and turmeric
1/4 teaspoon each: cinnamon, salt and cayenne pepper
1 cup water
1 medium eggplant, peeled and cut into 1/4 inch cubes (about 4 cups)
1 1-pound can chopped tomatoes
1/2 cup raisins
1 1-pound can chick peas, rinsed and drained (or 2 cups of cooked chick peas)

Directions:

1. Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat.
2 Add onion and garlic.
3. Cook, stirring occasionally, 3 minutes.
4. Add carrots, bell pepper, spices and 1/2 cup of the water.
5. Cook, stirring occasionally, 5 minutes.
6. Add all remaining ingredients.
7. Cover and simmer over medium-low heat, 30 minutes or until vegetables are tender.
8. Stir several times during cooking.
9. Serve over couscous, rice or any cooked grain.

Serves 4.

Source: http://www.thegutsygourmet.net/morraccstew.html

Mint Tea (national drink)

Ingredients:

10 fresh mint sprigs, plus 4 for garnish
3 teaspoons green tea
3 tablespoons sugar
4 cups water

Directions:

1. Boil water.
2. Pour a small amount in teapot and swish around to warm the pot.
3. Combine the mint and green tea and sugar in the teapot, then fill it with the rest of the hot water.
4. Let tea brew, stirring the leaves once or twice, for 3 minutes.
5. Pour tea through a tea strainer into glass teacups to serve.
6. Garnish with remaining 4 sprigs of mint.

Source: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/morocco-mint-tea-recipe/index.html

PASTILLA

Makes two medium pastilles.

Ingredients:

4-6 small onions
2 tbsp olive oil
1 package pastilla papers (or phyllo or strudel dough)
½ cup almonds
½ cup walnuts
¼ cup shelled peanuts (or more if you like)
6 eggs
1 cooked chicken breast
spices:
½ tsp salt
½ tsp black pepper
1 tbsp paprika
½ tsp curry
¼ tsp red pepper
¼ tsp ras al hanut

Directions:

Add other spices as you like. Use cinnamon or powdered sugar for decoration.
Chop onions with medium slice and put into pot or pressure cooker. Add measured spices, olive oil and water not to cover onions completely (perhaps two cups). Cover and cook on high heat until onions are soft and water is almost but not completely boiled down. This takes about an hour (less time in pressure cooker). Onions should be wet but not watery.
While onions are cooking, grind nuts coarsely in nut grinder.
Open bottle of wine and toast to pastilla.
Shred chicken into medium-fine pieces; remove skin.
When onions are finished, remove from flame. Add nut mixture, chicken and 6 raw eggs to pot of onions, reserving some egg white. Mix, put back on flame for a few minutes, stir.
Grease pans and preheat oven to 400 F, 200 C. Place three pastilla papers in bottom of pan. Cover with an even layer of filling ¼ inch thick. Add a layer of pastilla paper (you might have to tear a big paper in half). Add a second layer of filling and then top with a folded paper. Brush with egg white and tuck ends of bottom papers in to pan. Sprinkle with a little powdered sugar. This will be the bottom. Bake for 20-30 minutes until paper is crispy and golden brown. Remove from oven and turn over on plate. Sprinkle with powdered sugar and bake an additional 10-15 minutes. Remove from oven, flip again and decorate with criss-cross lines or other patterns of cinnamon.
Serve hot on bed of fresh mint leaves. Also delicious served cold.

Source: Youssef Boulaalam and Kristina Larson

Zaluk (eggplant) or Tktuka (pepper) salad

Roast (3 medium eggplant or 8 medium green peppers) on open flame until black, maybe ten minutes – can do on stovetop or in oven, but it will make the taste slightly different.
When cool enough to touch, remove the black and chop/dice the eggplant or pepper.
Grate half as many tomatoes as you have eggplant or pepper. Peeling tomato beforehand is optional (Moroccans do so).
Peel and grate 3 garlic cloves.
Coat skillet with olive oil, about 4 Tbsp. Add tomatoes and garlic and start to stir over medium flame. While cooking, add
1 tsp cumin
1 tsp paprika
1 tsp salt
Stir for a few minutes, and then add the eggplant or pepper.
Add a handful of parsley.
Add 2 Tbsp tomato paste if desired.
Stir for a few minutes more and then serve hot, cold or at room temperature.
We also learned the basic spice mixture that goes into any tagine – our lunch was sheep and prune tagine. You cut the meat into small slices for even cooking and then add
1 onion, diced
3 garlic cloves
½ cup or so of olive oil
2 tsp salt
2 Tbsp ginger
2 tsp yellow spice (I think it is yellow saffron but we couldn’t translate or tell by taste)
3 Tbsp parsley
2 tsp black pepper
While the tagine is cooking, add another onion. And add water as it cooks to keep the tagine from drying out – lots of water (somehow I didn’t witness this though).
Meanwhile, the prunes (or quince, or whatever is being added) are being cooked with water (and in the case of the prunes – which were also soaked overnight - sugar) in a pressure cooker; they get added to the tagine at the end as a topping. It takes a while to stew – maybe an hour?

Source: Sharon Keld